Archive for the ‘White Tongue Coating’ Category

White Tongue Lesions

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White tongue lesions are difficult to diagnose on the internet because tongue lesions can represent any ulcer, bump, or abnormality on the tongue.

Causes of White Tongue Lesions

An Example of White Tongue Lesions *from consultantlive.com

Sometimes white tongue lesions are spots of fungal or bacterial infection on the tongue (ie. oral thrush, lichen planus) that appear as white patches. Other white tongue lesions are canker or cold sores that appear on the tongue or the sides of the mouth.

White tongue lesions can also indicate anemia, vitamin deficiencies, malnutrition, skin diseases, and HIV.

Commonly white tongue lesions simply appear from exposure to something, whether it is mint flavored gum, acidic food, powerful toothpaste, tobacco, alcohol, or spicy food. These white tongue lesions are usually tender to touch and movement, and may result in difficulty speaking, eating, and tasting, depending on how much of the tongue has been affected.

White Tongue Lesions Treatment

There are many ways to treat white tongue lesions depending on what caused them and what the patient is most comfortable with. Most white tongue lesions should clear on their own within three to five days. For those that don’t, see a doctor for a clear and correct diagnosis.

In the mean time you can gargle with salt water or diluted hydrogen peroxide. Try to avoid foods or beverages that may have caused your tongue lesions, as well.

Most importantly, practice good oral hygiene. By brushing your teeth, flossing, and brushing your tongue regularly, your mouth will have a better fighting chance against whatever is ailing it (especially if the ailment is bacteria).

Brushing your tongue with an Orabrush–a most wonderful and effective tongue brush–will remove bacteria and food residue from your tongue. Talk about a fast way to a clean mouth and a happy tongue with no more white tongue lesions!

Coated Tongue Treatment

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If you have a coated tongue, you likely want to shed that coat and return to your normal pink tongue. We don’t blame you. A coat on the tongue can consist of over 500 types of bacteria, dead skin cells, and food residues.

If that coat is allowed to sit and fester it can lead to more serious tongue problems like oral thrush or tongue cancer, not to mention horribly bad breath. It really would be best to find some sort of coated tongue treatment. . . . Good thing we have some ideas for you!

Coated Tongue Treatments

If your tongue has a coat like this, it's time to have it treated. *from screening.iarc.fr

Before you resort to breaking out your razor blade to chop out your tongue, there are some things you can do to treat a coated tongue.

First, drink plenty of water. If you are well hydrated, all that bacteria and gunk will have a harder time sticking to your tongue. It will also keep that stuff from drying on your tongue causing a whole new host of tongue problems. This process also includes not breathing through your mouth. The more air that gets on your tongue to dry it out, the more problems you will have removing the bad stuff.

Next, stay away from tobacco and alcohol products. These products cause faster bacteria growth and harm the salivary glands in your mouth that keep your tongue hydrated.

Finally, practice good oral hygiene. That means brushing your teeth at least twice a day, flossing frequently, maybe using a mouth wash, and always brushing your tongue. Yes, you read that right. You have to brush your tongue to treat that coated tongue.

The best thing to use on your tongue is not a tongue scraper, toothbrush, or a spoon. Use an Orabrush if you want to remove the bacteria from your tongue without hurting it. The Orabrush is a tongue brush designed with microfiber bristles specifically for your tongue. These bristles move in between your taste buds pulling bacteria from the surface of your tongue and out of your mouth.

The Orabrush is the perfect coated tongue treatment for every mouth. It can help cure bad breath, and save your tongue from a bacteria disaster. Your tongue thanks you in advance.

White Tongue Cancer

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Tongue cancer shows itself in many ways. One of the most common symptoms is a white patch on the surface of the tongue, leading to the name “white tongue cancer.” Tongue cancer may be white, but there are many other symptoms to watch for that could warn of white tongue cancer sooner than a white patch.

White Tongue Cancer Symptoms:

Tongue cancer does not always look the same in different people. Tumors may appear in various parts of the tongue in all sizes and shapes.

Be aware of any unusual red or white patches in the mouth. Cancerous patches often have raised edges and are firm to the touch. At first, cancerous tongue spots may not hurt; though, they can turn into ulcers that bleed easily.

They usually become firmer and more tender as they grow. And spots of tongue cancer will grow if not treated. More advanced tumors can burn or become numb.

Also watch for sores or ulcers that won’t heal, bumps under the tongue or cheek, a sore throat, unexplained bleeding or swelling, bad breath, drooling, pain when swallowing, difficulty speaking or moving the jaw or tongue. Other unusual symptoms include dramatic weight loss, a change in the way dentures fit into the mouth, or an ear ache.

Some patients have explained tongue cancer as a persistent feeling of something stuck in the throat.

If you notice any of these tongue cancer symptoms persistently, and they do not heal on their own within two weeks, see a doctor. Infections and other diseases can cause similar symptoms to those listed here, but it is better to be safe than sorry. Only a biopsy can reveal whether cancerous cells are growing in the mouth.

What to do Until You Know You Have White Tongue Cancer:

Watch for spots of White Tongue Cancer like this *from t3.gstatic.com

In the mean time, take good care of your tongue to rule out some possible symptoms for tongue cancer. Good oral hygiene habits can drastically alter the way your tongue looks and feels. The most important thing to do is to clean your tongue!

Cleaning your tongue will help get rid of bacteria and infections on the surface of your tongue that could be causing some symptoms of white tongue cancer. The best tongue cleaner, really a tongue brush, is the Orabrush, designed specifically with the tongue in mind. It has microfiber bristles that pull bacteria off the tongue, instead of moving it all around like a toothbrush does.

So clean your tongue with an Orabrush to avoid white tongue cancer symptoms, and rest easier knowing your tongue is happier.

 

White Tongue Symptoms

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White tongue symptoms seem fairly self explanatory at first (how else do you describe a white tongue?), but there is more to know about symptoms of white tongue than the color.

White Tongue Symptoms

A White Tongue *from sitemaker.umich.edu

White tongue symptoms include color, texture, moisture level, and cause.

Color: Though your tongue may appear white, it may have tints anywhere from cream to black. Different colors on top of a white coat can indicated fungal growth, liver problems, or staining from food residues. Take time to study the color of your tongue carefully.

Texture and moisture level: The texture of a white tongue can show symptoms of bacterial growth, dehydration, or even cancer. If the texture of your tongue coating is slimy and thick it is most likely bacteria build up. If it is sticky or dry you may be dehydrated (or you may breathe through your mouth frequently). If your tongue has a white patch that feels bumpy, there is a small possibility it may be an indication of oral cancer. Have any white spots with these symptoms checked by a doctor.

White Tongue Symptom Causes

Your tongue could be white for a few different reasons. You may be dehydrated, have a bacterial infection on your tongue, or have taken oral antibiotics recently causing bacterial growth on your tongue.

Most likely, you just haven’t brushed your tongue in a while. Throughout the day (and sometimes night) as we eat, talk, and breathe, food and air particles are constantly touching our tongues. Not to freak you out, but most likely your tongue is white because it’s covered in a white film made of food residues, dried, dead skin cells, dead taste buds, and over 500 types of bacteria.

There, on your oh-so-moist and warm tongue, bacteria take up residence and tuck themselves in between your taste buds for the long haul. Often, those babies aren’t going to move until you make them.

Prevention of White Tongue Symptoms

The best way to prevent white tongue symptoms is to brush your teeth and tongue regularly. If you brush your tongue with a tongue brush, like an Orabrush for example, you will notice the white color begin to come away as the bacteria is pulled off of your tongue.

You probably see a slight change immediately, but the longer and more often you use your Orabrush, the more normal your tongue will look.

Tongue Pimple, White

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Do you have a white bump on your tongue that looks like a pimple? Don’t be afraid. Many other people have experienced the same condition and there’s good news–it won’t kill you! Unfortunately, it might still cause some pain. Here we have compiled a list of some of the most common causes of white tongue pimples.

Causes of Tongue Pimple, White

Tongue Pimple White *from api.ning.com

White tongue pimples have a few different origins. Often they appear because of friction or trauma to your tongue (like accidentally biting or pinching it). When your tongue is abused this way it sometimes makes a white tongue pimple instead of a bruise.

Beware that after a white tongue pimple has already formed, more friction (like rubbing your tongue on your teeth) will just be painful. Try to resist pushing your tongue around your mouth absentmindedly.

Acidic, spicy, or extremely hot foods can cause swollen taste buds that may turn into white tongue pimples. At the very least, your tongue may have a burning sensation and become sore for a little while.

The most common and strangely annoying cause of white tongue pimples is stress.  These are not contagious in any way and are usually not caused by bacterial infections on the tongue.

A white tongue pimple can (in rare cases) be an indication of serious diseases like diabetes. Normal white tongue pimples clear up on their own within 3 to 5 days. If they last much longer than that, see a doctor to have the bump diagnosed and, possibly, removed.

Preventing and Fighting a Tongue Pimple, White

If you already have a tongue pimple, avoid sugary and acidic foods that may further irritate the spot. Some sources suggest using mouth wash or gargling with salt to treat the painful spot.

Preventing white tongue pimples is a little more complicated because the causes vary so much, but overall the best thing to do is practice good oral hygiene. Brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss regularly, and brush your tongue to remove any irritating food residues from the day.

The best tongue brush is the Orabrush. It pulls food residues and bacteria build up from your tongue with its micro-fiber bristles leaving your tongue squeaky clean and ready for action.

Discoloration of Tongue

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When you’re searching for information on discoloration of tongues you will find tongues every possible, unsightly color from green to purple. However, the most common colors for an ailing, discolored tongue are white, yellow, black, and red. Here are some of the reasons for these less-than-desirable tongue colors.

White Discoloration of Tongue

This discoloration of tongue is from long papillae causing black, hairy tongue *from aafp.org

The discoloration of tongue that appears white may have a white film or coating. This coat can be caused by bacterial growth on your tongue, oral thrush, or leukoplakia.

Bacterial growth on the tongue is very normal and doesn’t usually cause pain, discomfort, or problems other than bad breath. However, when tongue bacteria is left to its own accord, it will continue to accumulate and may cause oral thrush.

Yellow Discoloration of Tongue

A yellowish discoloration of tongue can be the result of tongue bacteria that have been stained by dark colored food or drinks such as coffee or tea. Yellow tongue is often a precursor to black, hairy tongue, which we will cover in a moment.

Yellow discolored tongue can also follow the use to tobacco or alcohol. In rare cases a yellow tongue is an indicator of liver or gallbladder problems.

Black Discoloration of Tongue

A black discoloration of tongue normally means you have black, hairy tongue (that, or you just ate an Oreo). Black, hairy tongue is caused by papillae on your tongue that grow longer than normal. When papillae are longer they pick up more bacteria which are then stained easily by dark colored drinks or pigmented foods.

Black, hairy tongue looks worst after a big cup of coffee because coffee is usually so dark.

Red Discoloration of Tongue

Your tongue may be red if it is swollen or irritated. Often hot, spicy, or acidic food will irritate your taste buds and cause your tongue to take on a new hue from fiery red to a bright pink color. Trauma to your tongue, including biting or pinching it, can also cause swelling and discoloration.

Curing Discoloration of Tongue

As you may have noticed, many of the causes of discoloration of tongue revolve around tongue bacteria. In these cases, and in general, the best way to cure a discolored tongue is to clean it. Just like you clean your teeth with a toothbrush, you need to clean your tongue with a tongue brush, specifically an Orabrush.

The Orabrush is designed with soft, microfiber bristles that pull bacteria from in between your taste buds, removing it from your tongue. Once all that nasty bacteria is pulled away, your tongue can return to its normal color and will become healthier–not a bad trade.

 

 

Discolored Tongue

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When you’re searching for information on discolored tongues you will find tongues every possible, unsightly color from green to purple. However, the most common colors for an ailing, discolored tongue are white, yellow, black, and red. Here are some of the reasons for these less-than-desirable tongue colors.

White Discolored Tongue

This discolored tongue is likely the beginning of black, hairy tongue *from aafp.org

A discolored tongue that appears white may have a white film or coating. This coat can be caused by bacterial growth on your tongue, oral thrush, or leukoplakia.

Bacterial growth on the tongue is very normal and doesn’t usually cause pain, discomfort, or problems other than bad breath. However, when tongue bacteria is left to its own accord, it will continue to accumulate and may cause oral thrush.

Yellow Discolored Tongue

A yellowish discolored tongue can be the result of tongue bacteria that have been stained by dark colored food or drinks such as coffee or tea. Yellow tongue is often a precursor to black, hairy tongue, which we will cover in a moment.

Yellow discolored tongue can also follow the use to tobacco or alcohol. In rare cases a yellow tongue is an indicator of liver or gallbladder problems.

Black Discolored Tongue

A black discolored tongue normally means you have black, hairy tongue (that, or you just ate an Oreo). Black, hairy tongue is caused by papillae on your tongue that grow longer than normal. When papillae are longer they pick up more bacteria which are then stained easily by dark colored drinks or pigmented foods.

Black, hairy tongue looks worst after a big cup of coffee because coffee is usually so dark.

Red Discolored Tongue

Your tongue may be red if it is swollen or irritated. Often hot, spicy, or acidic food will irritate your taste buds and cause your tongue to take on a new hue from fiery red to a bright pink color. Trauma to your tongue, including biting or pinching it, can also cause swelling and discoloration.

Curing a Discolored Tongue

As you may have noticed, many of the causes of discolored tongue revolve around tongue bacteria. In these cases, and in general, the best way to cure a discolored tongue is to clean it. Just like you clean your teeth with a toothbrush, you need to clean your tongue with a tongue brush, specifically an Orabrush.

The Orabrush is designed with soft, microfiber bristles that pull bacteria from in between your taste buds, removing it from your tongue. Once all that nasty bacteria is pulled away, your tongue can return to its normal color and will become healthier–not a bad trade.

 

Yellowish Tongue Coating

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If there is anything worse than a white tongue coating it is probably a yellowish tongue coating. There are many different causes of yellowish tongue coatings, but most of them focus on swollen papillae (those little taste buds on your tongue). Here are a few different causes.

Causes of a Yellowish Tongue Coating

Yellowish Tongue Coating *from 2.bp.blogspot.com

As we just mentioned, papillae on your tongue can become irritated and inflamed. This happens when certain foods or substances you put in your mouth have a bad reaction with your tongue.

For example, hot, spicy, or highly acidic foods can cause a burning sensation on your tongue, to which your papillae respond with swelling. Other substances that irritate the tongue are alcohol, tobacco products, and coffee.

The problem with inflamed papillae is that they tend to pick up extra, unwanted bacteria that latch onto your tongue and cause bad breath, bacterial infections, and that white or yellow, filmy slime on the surface of your tongue. Yellowish tongue coatings are usually the side effect of bacteria on your tongue that begin to produce pigment, staining the coating on your tongue.

If you do not take care of your bacteria covered tongue quickly, the bacteria can continue to build up, causing more serious bacterial infections and fungal growth known as oral thrush.

A yellowish tongue coating can also be an early sign of black, hairy tongue, an unfortunate (but harmless) condition that normally starts when papillae grow too long for the normal tongue. When the papillae grow, they pick up more bacteria. Before you know it, you happen to drink some morning coffee or tea and notice your tongue has turned a strange color. Well, that morning beverage has a dark pigment that stains your extra long taste buds and the bacteria thereon. Voila, yellowish (or brownish, or greenish) tongue coating.

In a few rare cases, a yellowish tongue coating has been known to be a side effect of liver or gallbladder problems. Chances are that isn’t your problem, but see a doctor if the symptoms persist and you begin to notice other liver or gallbladder problems.

Often, a yellowish tongue coating is aggravated by poor oral hygiene, fever, mouth breathing, dehydration, and some types of anti-depressants and antihistamines. Yellowish tongue coatings are also sometimes accompanied by a cotton mouth feeling or itching in the mouth. See a doctor if either of these symptoms occur.

Preventing a Yellowish Tongue Coating

There are a few things you can do to prevent a yellowish tongue coating. First, avoid alcohol, tobacco products, and coffee or other drinks with dark pigments. Next, you can stay aware of common side effects from any medications you may be taking. Also, try not to breathe through your mouth on a regular basis. And most importantly, practice good oral hygiene!

Oral hygiene, including brushing your teeth, flossing, and brushing your tongue, can greatly improve your oral health and the color of your tongue. Brushing your tongue, especially with an Orabrush, will remove bacteria from the surface of your tongue, help shorten your papillae, and remove pigments from your tongue. All around, the Orabrush is your best tool to fight a yellowish tongue coating.

Yellow Coated Tongue

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If there is anything worse than a white coated tongue it is probably a yellow coated tongue. There are many different causes of yellow coated tongue, but most of them focus on swollen papillae (those little taste buds on your tongue). Here are a few different causes.

Causes of Yellow Coated Tongue

Yellow Coated Tongue *from 2.bp.blogspot.com

As we just mentioned, papillae on your tongue can become irritated and inflamed. This happens when certain foods or substances you put in your mouth have a bad reaction with your tongue.

For example, hot, spicy, or highly acidic foods can cause a burning sensation on your tongue, to which your papillae respond with swelling. Other substances that irritate the tongue are alcohol, tobacco products, and coffee.

The problem with inflamed papillae is that they tend to pick up extra, unwanted bacteria that latch onto your tongue and cause bad breath, bacterial infections, and that white or yellow, filmy slime on the surface of your tongue. A yellow coated tongue is usually the side effect of bacteria on your tongue that begin to produce pigment, staining the coating on your tongue.

If you do not take care of your bacteria covered tongue quickly, the bacteria can continue to build up, causing more serious bacterial infections and fungal growth known as oral thrush.

A yellow coated tongue can also be an early sign of black, hairy tongue, an unfortunate (but harmless) condition that normally starts when papillae grow too long for the normal tongue. When the papillae grow, they pick up more bacteria.

Before you know it, you happen to drink some morning coffee or tea and notice your tongue has turned a strange color. Well, that morning beverage has a dark pigment that stains your extra long taste buds and the bacteria thereon. Voila, yellow (or brown, or green) coated tongue.

In a few rare cases, yellow coated tongue has been known to be a side effect of liver or gallbladder problems. Chances are that isn’t your problem, but see a doctor if the symptoms persist and you begin to notice other liver or gallbladder problems.

Often, yellow coated tongue is aggravated by poor oral hygiene, fever, mouth breathing, dehydration, and some types of anti-depressants and antihistamines. Yellow coated tongue is also sometimes accompanied by a cotton mouth feeling or itching in the mouth. See a doctor if either of these symptoms occur.

Preventing Yellow Coated Tongue

There are a few things you can do to prevent an unfortunate yellow coated tongue. First, avoid alcohol, tobacco products, and coffee or other drinks with dark pigments. Next, you can stay aware of common side effects from any medications you may be taking. Also, try not to breathe through your mouth on a regular basis. And most importantly, practice good oral hygiene!

Oral hygiene, including brushing your teeth, flossing, and brushing your tongue, can greatly improve your oral health and the color of your tongue. Brushing your tongue, especially with an Orabrush, will remove bacteria from the surface of your tongue, help shorten your papillae, and remove pigments from your tongue. All around, the Orabrush is your best tool to fight a yellow coated tongue.

 

Tongue Coating Yellow

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If there is anything worse than a white tongue coating it is probably a yellow tongue coating. There are many different causes of yellow tongue coating, but most of them focus on swollen papillae (those little taste buds on your tongue). Here are a few different causes.

Causes of Tongue Coating, Yellow

Tongue Coating, Yellow *from 2.bp.blogspot.com

As we just mentioned, papillae on your tongue can become irritated and inflamed. This happens when certain foods or substances you put in your mouth have a bad reaction with your tongue.

For example, hot, spicy, or highly acidic foods can cause a burning sensation on your tongue, to which your papillae respond with swelling. Other substances that irritate the tongue are alcohol, tobacco products, and coffee.

The problem with inflamed papillae is that they tend to pick up extra, unwanted bacteria that latch onto your tongue and cause bad breath, bacterial infections, and that white or yellow, filmy slime on the surface of your tongue. Tongue coatings that are yellow are usually the side effect of bacteria on your tongue that begin to produce pigment, staining the coating on your tongue.

If you do not take care of your bacteria covered tongue quickly, the bacteria can continue to build up, causing more serious bacterial infections and fungal growth known as oral thrush.

A yellow tongue coating can also be an early sign of black, hairy tongue, an unfortunate (but harmless) condition that normally starts when papillae grow too long for the normal tongue. When the papillae grow, they pick up more bacteria.

Before you know it, you happen to drink some morning coffee or tea and notice your tongue has turned a strange color. Well, that morning beverage has a dark pigment that stains your extra long taste buds and the bacteria thereon. Voila, yellow (or brown, or green) tongue coating.

In a few rare cases, yellow tongue coatings have been known to be a side effect of liver or gallbladder problems. Chances are that isn’t your problem, but see a doctor if the symptoms persist and you begin to notice other liver or gallbladder problems.

Often, yellow tongue is aggravated by poor oral hygiene, fever, mouth breathing, dehydration, and some types of anti-depressants and antihistamines. Yellow tongue coatings are also sometimes accompanied by a cotton mouth feeling or itching in the mouth. See a doctor if either of these symptoms occur.

Preventing Tongue Coating, Yellow

There are a few things you can do to prevent a tongue coating that is, unfortunately, yellow. First, avoid alcohol, tobacco products, and coffee or other drinks with dark pigments. Next, you can stay aware of common side effects from any medications you may be taking. Also, try not to breathe through your mouth on a regular basis. And most importantly, practice good oral hygiene!

Oral hygiene, including brushing your teeth, flossing, and brushing your tongue, can greatly improve your oral health and the color of your tongue. Brushing your tongue, especially with an Orabrush, will remove bacteria from the surface of your tongue, help shorten your papillae, and remove pigments from your tongue. All around, the Orabrush is your best tool to fight a yellow tongue coating.