Archive for the ‘Tongue Bumps’ Category

Lumps on Tongue

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If you have lumps on your tongue and you are researching the internet to find out what they are, where they came from, and how to get rid of them, you are going to need some help.

First, take a deep breath. Your online research for symptoms will inevitably include the possibility of oral cancer. Just because lumps on tongues are sometimes a sign of cancer does not mean that most tongue lumps are cancerous.

What are lumps on the tongue?

Lumps on your tongue can be canker sores, inflamed papillae, irritated taste buds, or the result of a cold. Some are caused by infections and some are even the result of dental work.

Now, if the lumps on your tongue have been present for longer than a few weeks, it would be best to talk to a doctor or dentist about what the problem is.  But, if the lumps on your tongue are new to the scene, try to remember what may have caused your tongue to become lumpy in the first place.

What causes lumps on the tongue?

You may have an allergic reaction to a new food causing lumps on your tongue; biting your tongue, burning your tongue, cutting your tongue–all of these things could cause lumps.

One of the most common reasons for lumps on the tongue is not cleaning the tongue properly. If you don’t regularly clean your tongue, infections are more likely to spread on the surface wreaking all sorts of painful bacterial havoc in your mouth.

How can cleaning your tongue help?

Cleaning your tongue with an Orabrush is the best way to painlessly remove harmful bacteria from your tongue to avoid future lumps on your tongue. Simply place the soft bristled head of the Orabrush against the back of your tongue and pull forward. You will quickly see the difference Orabrush makes on your tongue.

Lumps on your tongue may be painful or annoying; however, they most likely aren’t cancerous. If they repeatedly return or cause you immense pain, see a doctor. In the mean time, clean your tongue.

Sores on the Tongue

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Sores on the tongue: the bane of your existence from the moment they form until the second they finally heal.

Between the uncomfortable swelling, tender spots, and sensitivity to different acidity levels and food temperatures, these tongue sores leave you hurting for help.

Where do sores on the tongue come from?

Often, sores on the tongue are contagious canker sores that can be transferred by mouth to mouth contact. Some sores on the tongue appear after the tongue has been burned by extremely hot foods. Other sores on the tongue are results of extremely acidic, sugary, or alcohol filled foods that have encouraged bacterial growth on the tongue.

How are sores on the tongue treated?

If your sores on the tongue are canker sores, there are many home remedies and over the counter products that can help reduce pain, but most painful canker sores on the tongue have to be waited out.

One way to treat sores on the tongue caused by acidic and sugary foods is using the Orabrush to remove hurtful bacterial growth on your tongue!

How do you use Orabrush on sores on the tongue?

To remove bacterial growth causing sores on the tongue, simply place the soft bristled end of the Orabrush on the back of your tongue and gently pull forward. You will see the gunk removed from your tongue on the Orabrush. Rinse your Orabrush and repeat!

Because you are removing the bacteria that cause sores on the tongue, it will be able to return to its happy, pink self in no time. And you will prevent future tongue sores from appearing (not to mention eliminating bad breath at the same time)!

Tongue Blisters

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Blisters, red sores festering into boils, burning constantly on your tongue, slowly taking over your complete concentration. If you have tongue blisters, you know exactly how they feel. These little spots agitate you until you are ready to rip your tongue out of your mouth.

What causes tongue blisters?

Tongue Blisters *from entusa.com

Though pulling your tongue out might seem like a quick remedy, it wouldn’t solve the real problem.

Tongue blisters are caused by extremely hot and overly acidic or salty foods, exposure to contagious canker sores, or improper cleaning techniques. Pushing your tongue blisters against your teeth or the side of your mouth will likely make them hurt worse, and could spread the infection or further irritate the blisters, so avoid the temptation.

There are better ways to deal with your blistered tongue.

How can you heal your tongue blisters?

Tongue blisters need to be treated carefully. There are many over the counter numbing agents that can be used to reduce pain and speed the healing process. Most often, time is the only thing that will heal them.

But if you don’t take care of the real problem, tongue blisters are likely to reappear.

How can you avoid tongue blisters?

Cleaning your tongue daily with an Orabrush can remove bacteria growing on your tongue and help to prevent tongue blisters! Just place the soft bristled head of the Orabrush against the back of your tongue an pull forward. You will see white gunk on the brush that is often the cause of infections and those annoying blisters.

If you regularly clean your tongue, you will be less susceptible to tongue blisters. That sounds like an easier option than ripping your tongue out. Besides, you might want it later.

Swollen Tongue

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Is your tongue swollen like the Mississippi river after a rainstorm and you don’t know why? Here are a couple of tips to help you figure out what’s going on.

Deciphering the Signs of a Swollen Tongue

Swollen Tongue *from i.i.com

First, you need to know if your whole tongue or only parts of your tongue are swollen.

Having a completely swollen tongue is often the result of an allergic reaction. Think back–have you had any unusual things in your mouth lately like a new nut, shellfish, or a foreign food? Chances are you may want to see a doctor about that.

If you are fairly certain your swollen tongue isn’t the result of a new food, there are plenty of other things that may have caused your tongue to grow. If you recently bit your tongue, had dental work done, or haven’t been cleaning your mouth properly, your tongue could be swelling as a reaction to trauma or infection.

Fixing Your Swollen Tongue

Swollen tongues, though uncomfortable, actually work naturally to try to save the rest of your mouth (and sometimes your whole body) the pain that your tongue is going through, so try not to get too upset about it. Most swollen tongues simply take time to return to normal.

To reduce swelling and pain in your tongue you can suck on some ice, but if your tongue is swollen for longer than a week, be sure to have it checked by a doctor. Sometimes a persistently swollen tongue can be a symptom of a more serious disease or infection than ice can take care of.

Cleaning Your Swollen Tongue

If your tongue is swollen because of a pesky infection on the surface of your tongue, you most likely need to take more care cleaning it every day. This could mean swishing with some Listerine or brushing your tongue more frequently.

The most effective tool to clean your tongue to avoid future swelling is to use an Orabrush. The Orabrush allows you to scrape nasty gunk that causes infections from the surface of your tongue.

Just place the soft bristled head against the back of your tongue and pull forward to pull off the bad stuff hiding between your taste buds. If you clean your tongue regularly, it will be sure to stay happy and healthy–no more swollen tongues.

Blisters on Tongue

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Blisters, red sores festering into boils, burning constantly on your tongue, slowly taking over your complete concentration. If you have blisters on your tongue, you know exactly how it feels. These little spots agitate you until you are ready to rip your tongue out of your mouth.

What causes blisters on your tongue?

Blisters (and other nasty things) on tongue *from entusa.com

Though pulling your tongue out might seem like a quick remedy, it wouldn’t solve the real problem.

Blisters on your tongue arise when your tongue is abused by extremely hot foods and overly acidic or salty foods, is exposed to contagious canker sores, or is not cleaned properly. Pushing the blisters on your tongue against your teeth or the side of your mouth will likely make them hurt worse, and could spread the infection or further irritate the blisters.

There are other ways to deal with your blistered tongue.

How can you heal blisters on your tongue?

Blisters on your tongue need to be treated carefully. There are many over the counter numbing agents that can be used to reduce pain and speed the healing process. Most often, time is the only thing that will heal tongue blisters.

But if you don’t take care of the real problem, blisters on your tongue are likely to reappear.

How can you avoid blisters on your tongue?

Cleaning your tongue daily with an Orabrush can remove bacteria growing on your tongue and help to prevent blisters on your tongue! Just place the soft bristled head of the Orabrush against the back of your tongue an pull forward. You will see white gunk on the brush that is often the cause of infections and those annoying blisters.

If you regularly clean your tongue, you will be less susceptible to blisters on your tongue. That sounds like an easier option than ripping your tongue out. Besides, you might want it later.

 

 

Spots on Tongue

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If your tongue seems to be taking on the characteristics of a dalmatian recently, covered in spots either white, red, or black, you may need to learn what those spots on your tongue are.

What causes spots on tongues?

These spots are from geographic tongue *from dentistry.com

Spots on your tongue can be anything from canker sores and geographic tongue, to oral herpes or oral cancer. Lucky for you, your spots are most likely not that serious.

Doctors have found that the most common cases of spots on tongues are geographic tongue, oral thrush, or canker sores. Most of these are caused by high stress, unusual hormone levels, vitamin deficiencies, or improper cleaning of your tongue.

What removes spots on your tongue?

To remove spots on your tongue, you may need to change your diet–eating less salty and acidic foods or eating more Vitamin B. Though cleaning your tongue regularly is also a helpful practice to get rid of tongue spots.

How do you clean tongues to avoid tongue spots?

The easiest and most widely effective way of reducing and avoiding spots on your tongue is to clean it thoroughly every day with an Orabrush. The Orabrush will help you to remove bacteria and food residues that gather on your tongue during the day.

To use the Orabrush, place the soft bristled head against your tongue and pull forward, removing gunk from the surface of your tongue.

You will probably not notice an immediate difference in the spots on your tongue, but rest assured that you have a cleaner, healthier tongue.

 

Tongue Sores

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Tongue sores: the bane of your existence from the moment they form until the second they finally heal.

Between the uncomfortable swelling, tender spots, and sensitivity to different acidity levels and food temperatures, these tongue sores leave tongues hurting for help.

Where do tongue sores come from?

Often, tongue sores are contagious canker sores that can be transferred from mouth to mouth contact. Some tongue sores appear after the tongue has been burned by extremely hot foods. Other tongue sores are results of extremely acidic, sugary, or alcohol filled foods that have encouraged bacterial growth on the tongue.

How are tongue sores treated?

If your tongue sores are canker sores, there are many home remedies and over the counter products that can help reduce pain, but most tongue sores have to be waited out.

One way to treat tongue sores caused by acidic and sugary foods is using the Orabrush to remove hurtful bacterial growth on your tongue!

How do you use Orabrush on tongue sores?

To remove bacterial growth causing tongue sores, simply place the soft bristled end of the Orabrush on the back of your tongue and gently pull forward.You will see the gunk removed from your tongue on the Orabrush. Rinse your Orabrush and repeat!

Because you are removing the tongue sore causing bacteria, your tongue will be able to return to its happy, pink self in no time. And you will prevent future tongue sores from appearing (not to mention eliminating bad breath at the same time)!

 

 

Sores Under Your Tongue

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Bumps under your tongue are normal; sores under your tongue are not. Usually the bumps under your tongue are salivary glands that help digest food with their acidic, secreted juices. But those other bumps–the ones that pop in for a few days, weeks, or months, and then disappear again–those are the ones people worry about.

What are sores under your tongue?

Sores under your tongue show up uninvited to the normal party in your mouth. They wreak havoc, trashing the whole place with red and white spots, making you (the host) incredibly annoyed.

The most common types of tongue sores show up as colorful bumps under your tongue. They can be open wounds or closed, painful, swollen lumps. The first thing to do is evaluate if the sores under your tongue are painful when touched or moved.

Painless Sores Under Your Tongue:

Painless tongue sores sometimes are blocked salivary glands or mucoceles. A mucocele is a blocked salivary gland that forms a clear bump under the tongue or along the side of the mouth. Mucoceles generally heal on their own, but if they become painful, swell to an uncomfortable size, or don’t heal after a few weeks, see a doctor for help.

Other painless sores under your tongue  may have been painful when they were first irritated. When you eat extremely hot, acidic, or spicy foods, your tongue often stings or burns for a moment before leaving patches of your tongue numb.These should go away relatively quickly, but you might not be able to taste anything in the mean time.

Painful Sores Under Your Tongue:

Painful tongue sores range in seriousness from canker sores to salivary gland stones and manifestations of oral cancer.

Canker sores can occur anywhere in your mouth and are very contagious, so be careful not to spread the virus in your mouth to other people or other parts of your mouth. We don’t want the party crashers to cause problems in other people’s mouths either.

Salivary gland stones are supposedly very painful. If you suspect you have one of these, see a doctor. Salivary gland stones are solved with ultrasonic treatment, which can take some time to accomplish, but the stone will eventually dissipate.

Oral cancer most often shows in older patients who have had frequent exposure to tobacco or alcohol, though oral cancer can also occur in people who do not fit any of the normal risk categories. So, if you feel any large bumps under your tongue that swell or cause immense pain, and they don’t heal after more than two weeks, see a doctor as soon as possible.

How do you prevent sores under your tongue?

Sores under your tongue are hard to prevent because they are hard to reach. However good oral hygiene habits can make a difference. Brushing and flossing your teeth regularly will help prevent plaque and bacterial build up in your mouth.

And don’t forget to brush you tongue! Many people don’t realize that brushing your tongue can prevent infections in your mouth and on your tongue that cause bumps and sores.

The best tool for brushing your tongue and preventing those sores is the Orabrush–a tool designed specifically for your tongue. It has soft bristles on the head that help remove harmful bacteria and combat bad breath.

Just brush your tongue with the Orabrush morning and night (or whenever you brush your teeth). Get rid of those uninvited, party crashing sores and see the difference of a happy tongue.

Canker Sores Under Tongue from intelligentdental.com

Tongue Lesions Causes

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The word lesion is enough to make your skin crawl, so a lesion on your tongue would definitely be something to squirm about. If you have a tongue lesion, you may be looking for the reason why.

Tongue Lesions Causes

Tongue lesions are symptoms of many health problems. They can show up if you are under significant, sustained stress, if you are pregnant and have large hormonal changes, if you have a cold or virus, and if you use tobacco products or drink alcohol on a regular basis. Other causes include malnutrition, anemia, mouth ulcers, prescriptions for other health problems, or eating extremely hot, acidic, or spicy foods and beverages.

All of these factors lead to changes in your mouth. These things affect what you put in your mouth to eat and the amount of time you make for oral hygiene. Bad oral hygiene habits contribute to increases in tongue lesions.

Types of Tongue Lesions

Tongue lesions can be any kind of sore, bump, or spot on the tongue. These include canker sores, enlarged papillae, tongue trauma (biting or cutting the tongue), Oral Thrush, black hairy tongue, and Kawasaki disease. Oral cancer and HIV are also possibilities.

There are many other types of tongue lesions, but each type can cause pain in the tongue if it is not treated properly. If your tongue lesion does not heal in 4-10 days, see a doctor and have him or her check how serious it is.

Treating Tongue Lesions

Treatments for tongue lesions vary depending on the type of lesion. If your tongue lesion is particularly painful, there are many prescribed and over-the-counter numbing agents available to ease pain. Other antibiotic or medicated treatment requires help from a doctor.

Oral hygiene is an important factor in preventing tongue lesions, especially brushing your tongue. The Orabrush was invented for doing exactly that.

The Orabrush has micro-fiber bristles made specifically to pull bacteria on your tongue that cause bad breath and tongue lesions. No other tongue cleaner is more effective and making and keeping happy tongues.

 

Mouth Sore Under Tongue

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Everyone has bumps under their tongues; not everyone has sores under their tongues. Most bumps under the tongue are salivary glands that produce juices needed to digest food. But those other sores–the ones that pop in for a few days, weeks, or months, and then disappear again–those are the ones people worry about.

What are mouth sores under the tongue?

Mouth sores under the tongue are presented in many different ways. The most common types of sores under the tongue manifest themselves as bumps. They can be open wounds or closed, painful, swollen lumps.

The first thing to do is evaluate if the sores under your tongue are painful when touched or moved.

Painless Mouth Sores Under the Tongue:

Often painless under the tongue sores are blocked salivary glands or mucoceles. A mucocele is a blocked salivary gland that forms a clear bump under the tongue or along the side of the mouth. These generally heal on their own, but if the bump becomes painful, swells to an uncomfortable size, or doesn’t heal after a few weeks, be sure to see a doctor.

Other painless sores under the tongue (though they may have been painful when they occurred) could be from eating extremely hot, acidic, or spicy foods that have left patches of your tongue numb. These should go away relatively quickly.

Painful Mouth Sores Under the Tongue:

Painful tongue sores range from canker sores (sometimes known as fever blisters) to salivary gland stones and manifestations of oral cancer.

Canker sores can occur anywhere in your mouth and are very contagious, so be careful not to spread the virus in your mouth to other people or other parts of your mouth.

Salivary gland stones are supposedly very painful. They are treated with ultrasonic treatment which can take some time to accomplish, but the stone will eventually dissipate.

Oral cancer most often shows in older patients who have had frequent exposure to tobacco or alcohol, though oral cancer can also occur in people who do not fit any of the normal risk categories.

If you feel any large bumps or sores under your tongue that swell or cause immense pain, and they don’t heal after more than two weeks, see a doctor as soon as possible.

How do you prevent mouth sores under the tongue?

Mouth sores under the tongue are hard to prevent because they are hard to reach, however good oral hygiene can make a difference. Brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, as well as brushing your tongue, will help prevent bacterial infections in your mouth that can cause other types of bumps on your tongue and in your mouth.

Brushing your tongue is one of the most important parts of oral hygiene that many people overlook. The Orabrush is a tool designed specifically for your tongue.

The Orabrush has soft bristles on the head that help remove harmful bacteria and combat bad breath. Just brush your tongue with an Orabrush morning and night (or whenever you brush your teeth) and see the difference a happy tongue can make.