Archive for the ‘Tongue Bumps’ Category

Sores on Tongues

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Sores on tongues: the bane of your existence from the moment they form until the second they finally heal.

Between the uncomfortable swelling, tender spots, and sensitivity to different acidity levels and food temperatures, these tongue sores leave tongues hurting for help.

Where do sores on tongues come from?

Sores on Tongues *from herpesz.com

Often, sores on tongues are contagious canker sores that can be transferred by mouth to mouth contact. Some sores on tongues appear after tongues have been burned by extremely hot foods. Other sores on tongues are the result of extremely acidic, sugary, or alcohol filled foods that have encouraged bacterial growth on the tongues.

How are sores on tongues treated?

If the sores on your tongue are canker sores, there are many home remedies and over the counter products that can help reduce pain, but most painful canker sores on the tongue have to be waited out.

One way to treat sores on tongues caused by acidic and sugary foods is using the Orabrush to remove hurtful bacterial growth on your tongue.

How do you use Orabrush on sores on tongues?

To remove bacterial growth causing sores on tongues, simply place the soft bristled end of the Orabrush on the back of your tongue and gently pull forward. You will see the gunk removed from your tongue on the Orabrush. Rinse your Orabrush and repeat!

Because you are removing the bacteria causing sores on tongues, it will be able to return to its happy, pink self in no time. And you will prevent future tongue sores from appearing (not to mention eliminating bad breath at the same time)!

Under the Tongue Sores

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Everyone has bumps under their tongues; Not everyone has sores under their tongues. Most bumps under the tongue are salivary glands that produce juices needed to digest food. But those other sores–the ones that pop in for a few days, weeks, or months, and then disappear again–those are the ones people worry about.

What are under the tongue sores?

Under the Tongue Sores *from canker-soretreatment.com

Under the tongue sores are presented in many different ways. The most common types of under the tongue sores manifest themselves as bumps. They can be open wounds or closed, painful, swollen lumps.

The first thing to do is evaluate if the sores under your tongue are painful when touched or moved.

Painless Under the Tongue Sores:

Often painless under the tongue sores are blocked salivary glands or mucoceles. A mucocele is a blocked salivary gland that forms a clear bump under the tongue or along the side of the mouth. These generally heal on their own, but if the bump becomes painful, swells to an uncomfortable size, or doesn’t heal after a few weeks, be sure to see a doctor.

Other painless under the sores could be from eating extremely hot, acidic, or spicy foods that have left patches of your tongue numb. These should go away relatively quickly.

Painful Under the Tongue sores:

Painful tongue sores range from canker sores (sometimes known as fever blisters) to salivary gland stones and manifestations of oral cancer.

Canker sores can occur anywhere in your mouth and are very contagious, so be careful not to spread the virus in your mouth to other people or other parts of your mouth.

Salivary gland stones are supposedly very painful. They are treated with ultrasonic treatment which can take some time to accomplish, but the stone will eventually dissipate.

Oral cancer most often shows in older patients who have had frequent exposure to tobacco or alcohol, though oral cancer can also occur in people who do not fit any of the normal risk categories.

If you feel any large bumps or sores under your tongue that swell or cause immense pain, and they don’t heal after more than two weeks, see a doctor as soon as possible.

How do you prevent under the tongue sore?

Under the tongue sores are hard to prevent, however good oral hygiene can make a difference. Brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, as well as brushing your tongue, will help prevent bacterial infections in your mouth that can cause other types of bumps on your tongue and in your mouth.

Brushing your tongue is one of the most important parts of oral hygiene that many people overlook. The Orabrush is a tool designed specifically for your tongue.

It has soft bristles on the head that help remove that harmful bacteria and also combats bad breath. Just brush your tongue with an Orabrush morning and night (or whenever you brush your teeth) and see the difference a happy tongue can make.

Sores Under the Tongue

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Everyone has bumps under their tongues. Not everyone has sores under their tongues. Most bumps under the tongue are salivary glands that produce juices needed to digest food. But those other sores–the ones that pop in for a few days, weeks, or months, and then disappear again–those are the ones people worry about.

What are sores under the tongue?

Sores Under Tongue *from canker-soretreatment.com

Sores under the tongue are presented in many different ways. The most common types of tongue sores manifest themselves as bumps under the tongue. They can be open wounds or closed, painful, swollen lumps.

The first thing to do is evaluate if the sores under your tongue are painful when touched or moved.

Painless Sores Under the Tongue:

Often painless tongue sores are blocked salivary glands or mucoceles. A mucocele is a blocked salivary gland that forms a clear bump under the tongue or along the side of the mouth. These generally heal on their own, but if the bump becomes painful, swells to an uncomfortable size, or doesn’t heal after a few weeks, be sure to see a doctor.

Other painless sores under the tongue could be from eating extremely hot, acidic, or spicy foods that have left patches of your tongue numb. These should go away relatively quickly.

Painful Sores Under the Tongue:

Painful tongue sores range from canker sores (sometimes known as fever blisters) to salivary gland stones and manifestations of oral cancer.

Canker sores can occur anywhere in your mouth and are very contagious, so be careful not to spread the virus in your mouth to other people or other parts of your mouth.

Salivary gland stones are supposedly very painful. They are treated with ultrasonic treatment which can take some time to accomplish, but the stone will eventually dissipate.

Oral cancer most often shows in older patients who have had frequent exposure to tobacco or alcohol, though oral cancer can also occur in people who do not fit any of the normal risk categories.

If you feel any large bumps under your tongue that swell or cause immense pain, and they don’t heal after more than two weeks, see a doctor as soon as possible.

How do you prevent sores under the tongue?

Sores under the tongue are hard to prevent, however good oral hygiene can make a difference. Brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, as well as brushing your tongue, will help prevent bacterial infections in your mouth that can cause other types of bumps on your tongue and in your mouth.

Brushing your tongue is one of the most important parts of oral hygiene that many people overlook. The Orabrush is a tool designed specifically for your tongue.

It has soft bristles on the head that help remove that harmful bacteria and also combats bad breath. Just brush your tongue with an Orabrush morning and night (or whenever you brush your teeth) and see the difference a happy tongue can make.

Bumps Under Tongue

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Everyone has bumps under their tongues. Most of these bumps are salivary glands that produce the juices needed to digest food. But those other bumps, the ones that pop in for a few days, weeks, or months, and then disappear again, those are the ones people worry about.

What are bumps under the tongue?

Bumps Under Tongue *from justanswer.com

If you have unusual bumps under your tongue, you are probably wondering where they came from. First evaluate if the bumps under your tongue are painful to touch or movement.

Often painless tongue bumps are blocked salivary glands or mucoceles. A mucocele is a blocked salivary gland that forms a clear bump under the tongue or along the sides of the mouth. These generally heal on their own, but if the bump becomes painful, swells to an uncomfortable size, or doesn’t heal after a few weeks, be sure to see a doctor.

Painful tongue bumps range from canker sores (sometimes known as fever blisters) to salivary gland stones and manifestations of oral cancer.

Canker sores can occur anywhere in your mouth and are very contagious, so be careful not to spread the virus in your mouth to other people or other parts of your mouth.

Salivary gland stones are supposedly very painful. They are treated with ultrasonic treatment which can take some time to accomplish, but the stone will eventually leave.

Oral cancer most often shows in older patients who have had frequent exposure to tobacco or alcohol, though it can also occur in people who do not fit any of the risk categories. If you feel a large bump under your tongue that swells or causes pain and doesn’t heal after more than two weeks, see a doctor as soon as possible.

How do you prevent bumps under the tongue?

Bumps under the tongue are hard to prevent, however good oral hygiene can make a difference. Brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, as well as brushing your tongue, will help prevent bacterial infections in your mouth that can cause other types of bumps on your tongue and in your mouth.

Brushing your tongue is one of the most important parts of oral hygiene that many people overlook. The Orabrush is a tool designed specifically for your tongue.

It has soft bristles on the head that help remove that harmful bacteria and also combats bad breath. Just brush your tongue with an Orabrush morning and night (or whenever you brush your teeth) and see the difference of a happy tongue.

Sore Tongue Bumps

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Tongue bumps are infinitely more annoying once they become sore and irritated. Everything from eating a sandwich to brushing your teeth is more painful and you can’t stop thinking about how much you want the soreness to end.

Your sore tongue bumps could be signs of many mouth maladies.

Causes of sore tongue bumps

Sore Tongue Bumps *from jacque.frusetta.com

Sore tongue bumps are sometimes caused by trauma (like biting or hitting your tongue), burning tongue syndrome (only a concern if you are a post-menopausal woman), smoking, canker sores , enlarged papillae, colds and infections, or oral cancer (not likely, but still a possibility).

Any of these things can create raised bumps on your tongue that can be sensitive to touch or irritation, especially when eating and talking. If your tongue bumps are sore, they could be just developing under the surface of your skin.

What you should know about sore tongue bumps

Take note of the color of your tongue bumps. The color can give you a better idea of what is wrong with your tongue. For example, a raised red circle with a white middle could be a canker sore, and enlarged papillae are normally varying shades of red, sometimes with a tiny white head on the end of the bud.

Keeping track of your sore tongue bumps is very important. Most tongue and mouth bumps and spots should heal within 4-10 days. After that point, consult a doctor for a full diagnosis.

Many of these tongue problems develop when a tongue is not properly cleaned.

How to clean your tongue

A good way to clean your sore tongue bumps and avoid future sore spots is using an Orabrush. This little plastic sidekick to a toothbrush can give your tongue the extra care it needs to stay clean and healthy.

Just place the soft bristled head against the back of your tongue and pull forward, removing excess gunk that has been collecting on the surface. By removing all that nasty goo, you are helping your tongue prepare to battle future sore tongue bumps.

Tongue Spots Red

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Are you seeing red? Or, at least, red on your tongue? Sometimes when patches of red start spreading on your tongue, they seem to be taking over your whole mouth.

Discovering Red Tongue Spots

Tongue Spots Red *from google.com

Red tongue spots are generally a sign of vitamin B12 deficiency, acid reflux, oral herpes, or oral thrush (a bacterial yeast infection in your mouth). Less frequently red tongue spots can be side effects of Scarlet Fever and Kawasaki disease (normally affects small children with autoimmune system problems).

When you have tongue spots, your tongue may swell or become inflamed. Normally large patches of the tongue turn a cherry red color, but this is sometimes only slightly different from the tongue’s normal pink color.

Other kinds of red tongue spots cause raised bumps that can be very sensitive and painful. For more information on those kinds of red tongue spots see Red Tongue Bumps.

Treating Red Tongue Spots

Treating red tongue spots can be difficult without an exact diagnosis, so seeing a doctor would likely be the first step to treating a red spotted tongue. Once you know the cause of your tongue spots you can effectively treat the root issue.

For red tongue spots from a vitamin deficiency, you may want to start by eating a balanced diet with foods high in vitamin B12.

However, if your tongue spots are caused by bacterial infection you may need to include foods like pro-biotic yogurt that can help kill bacteria on your tongue. Cleaning your tongue regularly will also help to reduce the amount of bacteria sitting on your tongue that cause red tongue spots.

Cleaning Red Tongue Spots

An awesome tool for cleaning your tongue is the Orabrush. The Orabrush has soft, micro-fiber bristles on the head that pull gunk from the surface of your tongue, removing nasty bacteria.

With a cleaner tongue, your body will be able to focus on more important problems, like keeping you from getting sick and helping you get through a long day of work.

Help your tongue get rid of its red spots and your tongue will help you.

Tongue Red Spots

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Are you seeing red? Or, at least, red on your tongue? Sometimes when patches of red start spreading on your tongue, they seem to be taking over your whole mouth.

Discovering a Tongue with Red Spots

Tongue Red Spots *from img.webmd.com

Red spots on the tongue are generally a sign of vitamin B12 deficiency, acid reflux, oral herpes, or oral thrush (a bacterial yeast infection in your mouth). Less frequently red spots on the tongue can be side effects of Scarlet Fever and Kawasaki disease (normally affects small children with autoimmune system problems).

When your tongue has these kinds of red spots, your tongue may swell or become inflamed. Normally large patches of the tongue turn a cherry red color, but this is sometimes only slightly different from the tongue’s normal pink color.

Other kinds of red spots on the tongue cause raised bumps that can be very sensitive and painful. For more information on those kinds of red tongue spots see Red Tongue Bumps.

Treating a Tongue with Red Spots

Treating red spots on the tongue can be difficult without an exact diagnosis, so seeing a doctor would likely be the first step to treating a tongue with red spots. Once you know the cause of your red spots you can effectively treat the root issue.

For red spots on the tongue from a vitamin deficiency, you may want to start by eating a balanced diet.

However, if your tongue spots are caused by bacterial infection you may need to include foods like pro-biotic yogurt that can help kill bacteria on your tongue. Cleaning your tongue regularly will also help to reduce the amount of bacteria sitting on your tongue.

Cleaning a Tongue with Red Spots

An awesome tool for cleaning your tongue is the Orabrush. The Orabrush has soft, micro-fiber bristles on the head that pull gunk from the surface of your tongue, removing nasty bacteria.

With a cleaner tongue, your body will be able to focus on more important problems, like keeping you from getting sick or helping you get through a long day of work.

Help your tongue and your tongue will help you.

Red Tongue Bumps

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Red tongue bumps–not to be confused with the pink or white variety–can be the result of swollen papillae, cold sores, allergic reactions, canker sores, or symptoms of serious problems like syphilis and oral cancer.

Now, don’t start hyperventilating just because the word cancer was in the last sentence. Though there is a miniscule probability of cancer, your red tongue bumps are most likely just a sign of an overworked mouth.

Where do red tongue bumps come from?

Red Tongue Bumps *from img.webmd.com

Your tongue reacts to things it comes in contact with. If you have been eating overly acidic or spicy foods, tasting boiling hot liquids, or munching on snacks with pointy or rough surfaces you could have irritated some of your taste buds.

Those little knobs (papillae) on your tongue that normally taste everything in your mouth can be the victims of harmful foods if your aren’t careful. And just like the rest of your body, your taste buds swell and become sensitive, making them appear extra red and bumpy.

Red tongue bumps can also be caused by trauma to the tongue (biting it, hitting it, piercing it), so think back to remember if you accidentally jarred your tongue recently.

How are red tongue bumps treated?

Swollen papillae and trauma induced red tongue bumps should heal in approximately 5 to 10 days from the day they appeared. This time frame also applies to canker sores and cold sores.

However, if your red tongue bumps are particularly painful you can find numbing agents that will help reduce the pain in your tongue at any drug store.

Red tongue bumps from allergic reactions can be more serious if they appear in conjunction with other symptoms like a swollen tongue or blocked airways. See a doctor for treatments if there is a possibility the bumps are related to an allergy.

For symptoms that do not heal or begin to heal within 10 days, see a doctor for a proper diagnosis. He or she may be able to prescribe something to help with pain or healing, as well as enlighten you on the causes for your red tongue bumps.

Sometimes red tongue bumps are caused by infections on the surface of your tongue. You need to clean your tongue regularly to avoid these nasty bumps.

How do you clean your tongue?

One of the most effective ways to clean your tongue is the Orabrush. The Orabrush is a tool designed with micro-fiber bristles on the head to help remove gunk on your tongue that causes infections and, not to mention, bad breath.

To use the Orabrush, place the bristled head against your tongue and pull forward. You will immediately see gunk pushed to the end of the brush caught in the bristles that is no longer caught on your tongue.

Your tongue will thank you.

 

White Spot on Tongue

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White spots on the tongue can be freaky. They sometimes appear overnight or in the middle of the day without you suspecting a thing. Don’t worry–gremlins haven’t been tampering with your mouth, planting these little white patches. The only monster you should be wary of is your own hygiene.

Where do white spots on the tongue come from?

White Spot on Tongue *from menstuff.org

White spots on the tongue are most often the result of overly acidic, spicy, or hot foods that irritate your taste buds. Those taste buds become inflamed and grow little white heads to show how angry they are.

Other times, white spots on the tongue or in the mouth are canker sores. Canker sores come from all sorts of things like extra stress, imbalanced hormones, or coming in contact with another someone’s canker sore (remember all that kissing the other night?).

Then there are other white tongue spots caused by bacterial infections on the surface of your tongue. That means your tongue is dirty, and it has finally decided to complain about not being treated properly (conveniently in the form of white bumps). Types of these infections are oral thrush, leukoplakia, or oral lichen planus.

How do you treat white spots on the tongue?

Some types of white tongue spots are very painful, while others are numb to feeling. If you are one of the unlucky people with a painful white spot on your tongue, you may want to get an over-the-counter numbing agent to help dull the throbbing.

In the mean time, avoid foods with high acidity like citrus fruit and anything with tomatoes. Acid will irritate your white spot even more, causing extra pain. You may also want to stay away from foods with sharp edges (chips, crackers, etc.) that could cut your mouth and the white spot on your tongue.

Generally, white spots on the tongue heal on their own in about 4 to 10 days. If for some reason they don’t, or if the pain in your tongue increases, see a doctor. He or she may be able to diagnose exactly what is wrong with your tongue and give you more treatment options.

For those white spots on the tongue that spring from a dirty tongue, the best treatment is to clean your tongue regularly and avoid tobacco and alcohol products.

How do you clean your tongue?

The Orabrush allows you to clean your tongue, harmlessly and effectively removing gunk from the surface of your tongue that can cause infections and bad breath. The soft micro-fiber bristles on the head of the Orabrush pull residue from your tongue.

All that bacteria removed makes for a happier tongue with fewer white spots in the future.

White Tongue Bumps

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White tongue bumps(sometimes called “lie bumps”) can be freaky. They sometimes appear overnight or in the middle of the day without you suspecting a thing. Don’t worry–gremlins haven’t been tampering with your mouth, planting these little white bumps. The only monster you should be wary of is your own hygiene.

Where do white tongue bumps come from?

White Tongue Bumps *from menstuff.org

White tongue bumps are most often the result of overly acidic, spicy, or hot foods that irritate your taste buds. Those taste buds become inflamed and grow little white heads to show how angry they are.

Other times, white tongue bumps are canker sores. Canker sores come from all sorts of things like extra stress, imbalanced hormones, or coming in contact with another someone’s canker sore (remember all that kissing the other night?).

Then there are other white tongue bumps caused by bacterial infections on the surface of your tongue. That means your tongue is dirty, and it has finally decided to complain about not being treated properly (conveniently in the form of white bumps).

How do you treat white tongue bumps?

Some types of white tongue bumps are very painful, while others are numb to most feeling. If you are one of the unlucky people with a painful white tongue bump, you may want to get an over-the-counter numbing agent to help dull the throbbing.

In the mean time, avoid foods with high acidity like citrus fruit and anything with tomatoes. Acid will irritate your white bump even more, causing extra pain. You may also want to stay away from foods with sharp edges (chips, crackers, etc.) that could cut your mouth and the white bump on your tongue.

Generally, white tongue bumps heal on their own in about 4 to 10 days. If for some reason they don’t, or if the pain in your tongue increases, see a doctor. He or she may be able to diagnose exactly what is wrong with your tongue and give you more treatment options.

For those white tongue bumps that spring from a dirty tongue, the best treatment is to clean your tongue regularly.

How do you clean your tongue?

The Orabrush allows you to clean your tongue, harmlessly and effectively removing gunk from the surface of your tongue that can cause infections and bad breath. The soft micro-fiber bristles on the head of the Orabrush pull residue from your tongue.

All that bacteria removed makes for a happier tongue with fewer white bumps in the future.